Tag Archives: breast implants

FDA calls for new warnings for breast implants

Laurie McGinley, The Washington Post: October 23, 2019.


The Food and Drug Administration, under fire from women who say they were harmed by breast implants, proposed on Wednesday that manufacturers detail possible complications from the devices, including rare cancers, a range of other symptoms and the need for additional surgeries.

The agency recommended that manufacturers use a boxed warning — the FDA’s strictest caution — to clearly spell out the risks of implants, including that they are not lifetime devices and that the chances of complications increase over time. The warning also would list the devices’ association with a rare form of lymphoma and say some patients have reported fatigue, muscle aches and joint pain.

The agency also proposed that patients be given a checklist to guide conversations with their surgeons about the risks and benefits of implants before women put down deposits for their surgeries. The move is a response to complaints from patients who said they weren’t adequately told about potential problems before surgery.

“We have heard from many women that they are not fully informed of the risks when considering breast implants,” FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy and Jeff Shuren, director of the agency’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said in a statement. The new recommendations are “designed to help inform conversations between patients and health care professionals when breast implants are being considered,” they added.

The FDA’s steps are the latest effort to deal with reports of complications involving devices that have been at the center of sometimes angry debate and legal actions for decades. The devices are used in about 400,000 surgeries in the United States every year, with 75 percent of the women involved getting implants for cosmetic reasons. Most of the rest get them as part of reconstruction after surgery for breast cancer.

Over the past few years, patients who say they were harmed by the devices have become increasingly active on social media sites that have enabled tens of thousands of patients to exchange information. The emergence of a rare cancer linked to implants in recent years also has drawn more attention to potential health problems associated with implants.

The FDA has said that 573 cases worldwide have linked the implants to a rare cancer since the agency began tracking the issue in 2011. The vast majority of those cases involved Allergan textured implants, which have been recalled. Thirty-three women have died of what’s known as breast implant-associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a cancer of the immune system, the agency said. At the same time, thousands of women have complained of fatigue, brain fog and other problems that collectively are called “breast implant illness.”

Nicole Daruda, an activist from Vancouver, Canada, who runs one of the most popular websites for women who have had trouble with implants, welcomed the FDA’s announcement, but said it was long overdue. “This is what needs to happen,” said Daruda, who had her implants removed after experiencing several health problems. “But I don’t think it would have without our putting intense pressure” on the agency.

Diana Zuckerman, president of the nonprofit National Center for Health Research who has been working on implant issues for 30 years, said the FDA’s moves are “very important.” But she expressed concern they might yet be weakened, and are not legally binding because they are in the form of “guidance” to the industry. Whether the implant makers actually follow the recommendations “depends on how much pressure the FDA puts on the manufacturers,” she said.

The FDA’s steps are the latest in the agency’s stepped-up scrutiny of the devices, which included a dramatic two-day hearing in March during which many women demanded the FDA take steps to ensure patients have more information about the devices. About the same time, Zuckerman and Scot Glasberg, a past president of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons, formed a working group that included activists to make recommendations to the FDA, including for a boxed warning and a patient checklist of possible problems.

What the FDA is proposing “is very close to what we gave them,” Glasberg said, adding that other groups also made suggestions to the agency.

More than 70,000 women also signed a petition asking the FDA to require a checklist. The FDA, in issuing its recommendations on Wednesday, asked for public comment for 60 days before finalizing the guidance.

Breast implants became available in the United States in the 1960s. Three decades later, after years of reports about ruptured devices and possible links to autoimmune diseases, the FDA called for a moratorium on their use, saying manufacturers had not proved the devices’ safety and effectiveness. The devices were available only for cancer patients who were undergoing reconstructive procedures, and even then, only as part of a clinical trial. In 2006, the agency lifted the ban, approving two new silicone implants.

In 2011, the FDA issued a safety communication saying that women with breast implants might have a small increased risk of developing the rare lymphoma. In July, the implant maker Allergan announced a worldwide recall of its Biocell textured breast implants after the FDA found a sharp increase in a rare cancer and deaths linked to the products and asked the company to withdraw them from the U.S. market.

The FDA, in its proposed guidance Wednesday, also called for new screening guidelines for possible ruptures, as well as a recommendation that manufacturers include product ingredient information in the devices’ labeling that is easy for patients to understand.

Read the original article here.

29-Year-Old Fitness Model Gets Breast Implants Removed after She Says the Silicone Gave Her Seven Years of ‘Brain Fog, Bald Spots and Rashes’

Mary Kekatos, Daily Mail: December 19, 2018.


A fitness blogger said she had her breast implants removed because the silicone was ‘poisoning’ her.

Sia Cooper, the 29-year-old behind the blog Diary of a Fit Mommy, revealed she got implants in October 2011 to boost her self-confidence after weight loss left her with small breasts.

However, over the next seven years, the Florida mother-of-two struggled with extreme fatigue, facial rashes, chest pain, brain fog and even hair loss.

post-explant, 2 weeks

After undergoing multiple blood tests, diagnostic tests and X-rays that came back negative, Cooper was convinced her symptoms were related to what described as  ‘breast implant illness’.

 

Are breast implants safe? What is FDA’s Track Record?

Diana Zuckerman, PhD, Cancer Prevention & Treatment Fund

In 2013, a study showed that a rare cancer of the immune system, ALCL, which had previously been linked to saline breast implants and silicone breast implants, was caused by breast implants and could be fatal.  The latest research indicates that this cancer is sometimes cured by removing the breast implants, but at other times also requires radiation and chemotherapy; in some cases, the patients died despite treatment. Although the FDA had reported in 2011 that ALCL might be caused by breast implants, the agency didn’t update its website when the 2013 study was published.  It took the FDA more than 3 more years to revise articles on its website indicating that breast implants caused ALCL ( to conclude that breast implants could cause ALCL. The FDA reported that they have received 359 reports of ALCL among women with breast implants through February 2017. It’s likely there are still numerous unreported cases; for example, Australia’s medical agency estimates that one in 1,000women with breast implants develops ALCL.  There is no reason to think American women would be less likely to develop ALCL, and that would result in several thousand U.S. women developing ALCL

This is just the latest bad news for women with breast implants, and for the government agencies that have allowed them on the market with inadequate studies or warnings.  For example, in 2011, tens of thousands of defective breast implants made by PIP were recalled in Europe. An article in the December 2012 issue of the British medical journal Reproductive Health Matters explains how these developments illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of the safeguards intended to protect patients in different countries from unsafe breast implants and other medical devices.  In the U.S., breast implants are regulated as high-risk medical devices that must be proven reasonably safe and effective in clinical trials and subject to government inspection before they can be sold. This standard is higher than the FDA requires for hip joints, numerous cardiac devices, and many other medical implants. In contrast, clinical trials and inspections have not been required for breast implants or other implanted devices in Europe. As a result of these differing standards, the PIP breast implants that were recalled across Europe had already been removed from the U.S. market years earlier. The FDA was justifiably proud that they had done a better job of protecting breast cancer patients and cosmetic augmentation patients than the EU regulatory system. Nevertheless, the FDA track record on breast implants shows how limited those safeguards can be. The FDA required two breast implant companies to conduct enormous 10-year studies of breast implants, but has done little to ensure that the studies are providing useful information to patients.

The authors conclude that neither the European Union nor the U.S. has used their regulatory authority to ensure the long-term safety of breast implants. However, in 2012 the EU announced regulatory changes that could improve that situation. In addition, the CEO of PIP was sentenced to 4 years in prison by a French Court, and in January 2017, a French court demanded that the German regulatory company that had certified PIP implants as safe pay $60 million euros to women harmed by PIP implants. This is only 3,000 euros each to 20,000 women, however.

Meanwhile, the FDA shows no indication that they will improve their safeguards on breast implants or other medical implants; in fact, those safeguards have weakened since 2012.

For more information about ALCL caused by breast implants, see:

Miranda RN, Aladily TN, Prince HM, et al: Breast implant–associated anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: Long-term follow-up of 60 patients. J Clin Oncol 32:114-120, 2014.

Mazzucco, AE.  Next Steps for Breast Implant-Associated Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma. J Clin Oncol, 2014.  Early Release publication. June 16, 2014.