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NCHR Comments on the MDUFA V Commitment Letter

April 21, 2022

The National Center for Health Research (NCHR) appreciates the opportunity to provide public comments on the Medical Device User Fee Amendments (MDUFA) V Commitment letter, and to express our substantial concerns with the overall process as well as the shortcomings of the Commitment letter.

NCHR is a nonprofit think tank that conducts, analyzes, and scrutinizes research on a range of health issues and health policies, with particular focus on ensuring that treatments are safe and effective for patients and consumers. We do not accept funding from companies that make products that are the subject of our work, so we have no conflicts of interest.

The negotiations between the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and medical device industry are unlike regulatory processes at other federal agencies. The typical process is more transparent and includes meaningful stakeholder engagement and feedback from the public. The fact that the very industries being regulated by the FDA meet behind closed doors with FDA staff to negotiate a Commitment Letter, with no members of the public allowed to be in the room or have access to a transcript or recording, raises important questions about why industry has more say in FDA policies and practices than other Stakeholders. We previously pointed out the lack of transparency and the lack of meeting minutes, which we were told would be publicly available – but weren’t.

This proposed Commitment letter, although late, has already been delivered to Members of Congress. The House Energy & Commerce Subcommittee on Health held a hearing on March 30, 2022, on the contents of the proposed Commitment Letter. It seems disingenuous to request public feedback, at this week’s meeting or in writing, at this late point in the process.

In addition to the lack of transparency in the process and lack of public representation in negotiations between FDA and the medical device industry, the Commitment Letter fails to include any performance measures specifically linked to patient safety. Given the lack of safety or effectiveness data prior to clearance or approval of more than 95% of medical devices, post-market surveillance is crucially important. And yet, the Commitment Letter provides no requirement for financial support for post-market monitoring of studies or MAUDE reports, putting patients at risk for years to come.

Despite our lack of confidence in the FDA’s negotiated agreement with industry, below are our specific recommendations for your consideration as you finalize the MDUFA V Commitment Letter:

  1. Include performance measures tied to device safety, such as total time to recall a device following adverse event reporting.
  2. Direct any additional funds earned by FDA for meeting premarket performance goals to post-market surveillance activities.
  3. The total product life cycle advisory program (TAP) should include post-market activities to truly capture the full life cycle. This is becoming even more important as devices become more complex and technology rapidly changes. User fees should be used to support technology systems to monitor devices. Based on the description in the proposed Commitment Letter, TAP would focus on early communication with industry to troubleshoot potential issues with applications, but not to monitor the devices once they are on the market.
  4. Diversity and accessibility performance measures should be included in the proposed Commitment Letter.
    1. Industry could be provided a discount on fees if certain diversity performance goals are met in a PMA application.
    2. Industry should be required to include a detailed plan on potential device recalls. The plan should include how information will be shared with patients and what steps will be taken to ensure the information is presented in a timely manner and accessible formats.

When Congress required that stakeholders have the opportunity to participate in the MDUFA V reauthorization process, they intended that our participation would be meaningful. This is the final opportunity for the FDA to fulfill that obligation in MDUFA V.